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Hao Wang, MD

Role of HEART score in evaluating clinical outcomes among emergency department patients with different ethnicities

Fri, 04/30/2021 - 05:00

J Int Med Res. 2021 Apr;49(4):3000605211010638. doi: 10.1177/03000605211010638.

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine the role of the HEART (history, EKG, age, risk factors, and troponin) score in the evaluation of six clinical outcomes among three groups of patients in the emergency department (ED).

METHODS: We performed a retrospective observational study among three ED patient groups including White, Black, and Hispanic patients. ED providers used the HEART score to assess the need for patient hospital admission and for emergent cardiac imaging tests (CITs). HEART scores were measured using classification accuracy rates. Performance accuracies were measured in terms of HEART score in relation to four clinical outcomes (positive findings of CITs, ED returns, hospital readmissions, and 30-day major adverse cardiac events [MACE]).

RESULTS: A high classification accuracy rate (87%) was found for use of the HEART score to determine hospital admission. HEART scores showed moderate accuracy (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.66-0.78) in predicting results of emergent CITs, 30-day hospital readmissions, and 30-day MACE outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS: Providers adhered to use of the HEART score to determine hospital admission. The HEART score may be associated with emergent CIT findings, 30-day hospital readmissions, and 30-day MACE outcomes, with no differences among White, Black, and Hispanic patient populations.

PMID:33926275 | DOI:10.1177/03000605211010638

Association between burnout and wellness culture among emergency medicine providers

Mon, 04/12/2021 - 05:00

Clin Exp Emerg Med. 2021 Mar;8(1):55-64. doi: 10.15441/ceem.20.074. Epub 2021 Mar 31.

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Burnout is a common occurrence among healthcare providers and has been associated with provider wellness culture. However, this association has not been extensively studied among emergency medicine (EM) providers. We aim to determine the association between EM provider burnout and their culture of wellness, and to elicit the independent wellness culture domains most predictive of burnout prevention.

METHODS: This was a multi-center observational study. We enrolled EM physicians and advanced practice providers from sixteen different emergency departments (EDs). Provider wellness culture and burnout surveys were performed. The wellness culture domains included in this study are personal/organizational value alignment, provider appreciation, leadership quality, self-controlled scheduling, peer support, and family support. Correlations between each wellness culture domain and burnout were analyzed by Pearson correlation co-efficiency, and their associations were measured by multivariate logistic regression with adjustments of other confounders.

RESULTS: A total of 242 ED provider surveys were entered for final analysis. The overall burnout rate was 54% (130/242). Moderate correlations were found between burnout and two wellness culture domains (value alignment: r=-0.43, P<0.001 and provider appreciation: r=-0.49, P<0.001). The adjusted odds ratio of provider appreciation associated with burnout was 0.44 (95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.77; P=0.004), adjusted odds ratio of family support was 0.67 (95% confidence interval, 0.48-0.95; P=0.025).

CONCLUSION: ED providers have a relatively high burnout rate. Provider burnout might have certain associations with wellness culture domains. Provider appreciation and family support seem to play important roles in burnout protection.

PMID:33845524 | DOI:10.15441/ceem.20.074

Community Disparities in Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Care and Outcomes in Texas

Fri, 04/02/2021 - 05:00

Resuscitation. 2021 Mar 30:S0300-9572(21)00125-8. doi: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2021.03.021. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Large racial and socioeconomic inequalities exist for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) care and outcomes. We sought to characterize racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in OHCA care and outcomes in Texas.

METHODS: We analyzed 2014-2018 Texas-Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) data. Using census tracts, we defined race/ethnicity neighborhoods based on majority race/ethnicity composition: non-Hispanic/Latino white, non-Hispanic/Latino black, and Hispanic/Latino. We also stratified neighborhoods into socioeconomic categories: above and below the median for household income, employment rate, and high school graduation. We defined outcomes as bystander CPR rates, public bystander AED use, and survival to hospital discharge. Using mixed models, we analyzed the associations between outcomes and neighborhood (1) racial/ethnic categories and (2) socioeconomic categories.

RESULTS: We included data on 18,488 OHCAs. Relative to white neighborhoods, black neighborhoods had lower rates of AED use (OR 0.3, CI 0.2-0.4), and Hispanic/Latino neighborhoods had lower rates of bystander CPR (OR 0.7, CI 0.6-0.8), AED use (OR 0.4, CI 0.3-0.6), and survival (OR 0.8, CI 0.7-0.8). Lower income was associated with a lower rates of bystander CPR (OR 0.8, CI 0.7-0.8), AED use (OR 0.5, CI 0.4-0.8), and survival (OR 0.9, CI 0.9-0.98). Lower high school graduation was associated with a lower rate of bystander CPR (OR 0.8, CI 0.7-0.9) and AED use (OR 0.6, CI 0.4-0.9). Higher unemployment was associated with lower rates of bystander CPR (OR 0.9, CI 0.8-0.94) and AED use (OR 0.7, CI 0.5-0.99).

CONCLUSION: Minority and poor neighborhoods in Texas experience large and unacceptable disparities in OHCA bystander response and outcomes.

PMID:33798624 | DOI:10.1016/j.resuscitation.2021.03.021

Community Variations in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Care and Outcomes in Texas

Mon, 03/29/2021 - 05:00

Prehosp Emerg Care. 2021 Mar 29:1-10. doi: 10.1080/10903127.2021.1907007. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

BackgroundLarge and unacceptable variation exists in cardiac resuscitation care and outcomes across communities. Texas is the second most populous state in the US with wide variation in community and emergency response infrastructure. We utilized the Texas-CARES registry to perform the first Texas state analysis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in Texas, evaluating for variations in incidence, care, and outcomes.MethodsWe analyzed the Texas-CARES registry, including all adult, non-traumatic OHCAs from 1/1/2014 through 12/31/2018. We analyzed the incidence and characteristics of OHCA care and outcome, overall and stratified by community. Utilizing mixed models accounting for clustering by community, we characterized variations in bystander CPR, bystander AED in public locations, and survival to hospital discharge across communities, adjusting for age, gender, race, location of arrest, and rate of witnessed arrest (bystander and 911 responder witnessed).ResultsThere were a total of 26,847 (5,369 per year) OHCAs from 13 communities; median 2,762 per community (IQR 444-2,767, min 136, max 9161). Texas care and outcome characteristics were: bystander CPR (43.3%), bystander AED use (9.1%), survival to discharge (9.1%), and survival with good neurological outcomes (4.0%). Bystander CPR rate ranged from 19.2% to 55.0%, and there were five communities above and five below the adjusted 95% confidence interval. Bystander AED use ranged from 0% to 19.5%, and there was one community below the adjusted 95% confidence interval. Survival to hospital discharge ranged from 6.7% to 14.0%, and there were three communities above and two below the adjusted 95% confidence interval.ConclusionWhile overall OHCA care and outcomes were similar in Texas compared to national averages, bystander CPR, bystander AED use, and survival varied widely across communities in Texas. These variations signal opportunities to improve OHCA care and outcomes in Texas.

PMID:33779479 | DOI:10.1080/10903127.2021.1907007

Can HEART Criteria Be Used as an Ideal Tool for Multilayer Clinical Outcome Predictions?

Wed, 01/27/2021 - 22:32
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Can HEART Criteria Be Used as an Ideal Tool for Multilayer Clinical Outcome Predictions?

Ann Emerg Med. 2021 Feb;77(2):277-278

Authors: Schrader CD, Meyering SH, Wang H

PMID: 33487324 [PubMed - in process]

The Role of Using HEART Score to Risk Stratify Chest Pain Among Emergency Department High Utilizers.

Wed, 12/30/2020 - 18:30
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The Role of Using HEART Score to Risk Stratify Chest Pain Among Emergency Department High Utilizers.

High Blood Press Cardiovasc Prev. 2020 Dec 28;:

Authors: Schrader CD, Meyering SH, Kumar D, Alanis N, D'Etienne JP, Shaikh S, Vo V, Kamaria AR, Huettner N, Wang H

Abstract
The HEART score is used to effectively risk stratify undifferentiated chest pain patients in the Emergency Department (ED). It is unclear whether such risk stratification can be applied among ED high utilizers. We aim to determine the efficacy and safety of using the HEART score to predict 30-day short-term major adverse cardiac events (MACE) in ED high utilizers. We conducted a retrospective, observational study in which ED high utilizers were defined as patients who had four or more ED visits within the past 12 months. ED high utilizers presenting at the study ED with chest pain were enrolled. Patients in which the HEART score was utilized were placed in the HEART group and patients with no HEART scores documented were placed to the usual care group. Hospital admissions and cardiac stress tests performed during the index hospitalizations, and 30-day MACE rates were analyzed and compared between the HEART and usual care groups. From January 1, 2017 to December 31, 2019, a total of 8,315 patient visits from ED high utilizers were enrolled. In the HEART group, 49% of ED visits were admitted with 20% receiving stress tests. A 30-day MACE outcome occurred among 1.4% of visits. In the usual care group, 44% of ED visits were admitted, with only 9% receiving index stress tests and a 1.5% of 30-day MACE occurrence (p=0.727). The study showed that similar short-term MACE outcomes occurred between patients using HEART scores and usual care to risk stratify chest pain among ED high utilizers.

PMID: 33369723 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Synergistic effects of emergency physician empathy and burnout on patient satisfaction: a prospective observational study.

Wed, 12/02/2020 - 12:47
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Synergistic effects of emergency physician empathy and burnout on patient satisfaction: a prospective observational study.

Emerg Med J. 2020 Nov 25;:

Authors: Byrd J, Knowles H, Moore S, Acker V, Bell S, Alanis N, Zhou Y, d'Etienne JP, Kline JA, Wang H

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Physician empathy and burnout have been shown to be independently associated with patient satisfaction. However, their correlations were uncertain in previous studies. We aimed to determine correlations among empathy, burnout, and patient satisfaction, and further analyse interactions among these factors.
METHOD: A single centre prospective observational study was conducted from December 2018 to August 2019 at JPS Health Network, USA. Emergency physician (EP) self-assessed empathy and burnout were measured by the Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE) and the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI) separately. We assessed patient perception of physician empathy and patient satisfaction with their treating physician by the Jefferson Scale of Patient Perception of Physician Empathy and a patient assessed satisfaction survey. Spearman's correlation was used to determine associations among JSE, patient assessed physician empathy, CBI and patient satisfaction. Additionally, JSE, patient assessed physician empathy and CBI predictive of patient satisfaction were measured by multivariate logistic regression analysis.
RESULTS: A total of 28 EPs and 423 patients were enrolled. Patient satisfaction had a weak correlation with JSE (ρ=0.11) but showed a strong correlation with patient assessed physician empathy (ρ=0.60). CBI showed no correlation with patient satisfaction (ρ<0.1). However, when JSE, patient assessed physician empathy and CBI were analysed together in relation to patient satisfaction, adjusted odds ratios (AOR) was 3.85 (95% CI 1.36 to 10.88) with high patient assessed physician empathy alone; AOR was 7.17 (2.62-19.67) when high patient assessed physician empathy was combined with low CBI; and AOR was 8.37 (3.07-22.83) when high patient assessed physician empathy, low CBI and high JSE were combined.
CONCLUSION: Patient assessed physician empathy had a strong positive correlation with patient satisfaction. Moreover, higher patient satisfaction was achieved from EPs of high patient assessed physician empathy, low CBI and high JSE, indicating a positive synergistic effect. These findings suggest different interventions might be applied to EPs of different wellness features to maximise patient satisfaction.

PMID: 33239313 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Do We Need a Modified HEART Score to Risk Stratify Chest Pain Patients in the Emergency Department?

Wed, 11/18/2020 - 07:52
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Do We Need a Modified HEART Score to Risk Stratify Chest Pain Patients in the Emergency Department?

Am J Cardiol. 2020 09 15;131:134

Authors: Schrader CD, Meyering S, Wang H

PMID: 32718556 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Worsening Renal Function After Diuresis Among Heart Failure Patients with Preserved Ejection Fraction --- A Dilemma to Heart Failure Management.

Wed, 11/11/2020 - 07:34
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Worsening Renal Function After Diuresis Among Heart Failure Patients with Preserved Ejection Fraction --- A Dilemma to Heart Failure Management.

Eur J Heart Fail. 2020 Nov 08;:

Authors: Starwalt JL, Ho AF, Wang H

PMID: 33161637 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

The value of using the HEART score among cocaine associated chest pain patients in the emergency department - A closer look.

Wed, 11/11/2020 - 07:34
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The value of using the HEART score among cocaine associated chest pain patients in the emergency department - A closer look.

Am J Emerg Med. 2020 Oct 29;:

Authors: Holmes KA, Posey RA, Wang H

PMID: 33148470 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Dedicated homeless clinics reduce inappropriate emergency department utilization.

Wed, 11/11/2020 - 07:34
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Dedicated homeless clinics reduce inappropriate emergency department utilization.

J Am Coll Emerg Physicians Open. 2020 Oct;1(5):829-836

Authors: Holmes CT, Holmes KA, MacDonald A, Lonergan FR, Hunt JJ, Shaikh S, Cheeti R, D'Etienne JP, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
Background: The homeless patient population is known to have a high occurrence of inappropriate emergency department (ED) utilization. The study hospital initiated a dedicated homeless clinic targeting patients experiencing homelessness with a combination of special features. We aim to determine whether this mode of care can reduce inappropriate ED utilization among homeless patients.
Methods: We conducted a retrospective observational study from July 1, 2017 to Dec 31, 2017. The study enrolled all homeless patients who visited any hospital regular clinic, dedicated homeless clinic, and ED at least once during the study period. ED homeless patients were divided into four groups (A: no clinic visits; B: those who only visited hospital regular clinic; C: those who only visited dedicated homeless clinic; and D: those who visited both hospital regular clinic and dedicated homeless clinic). The New York University algorithm was used to determine appropriate ED utilization. We compared inappropriate ED utilization among patients from these groups. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the risks of different clinical visits in association with inappropriate ED utilization.
Results: A total of 16,323 clinic and 8511 ED visits occurred among 5022 unique homeless patients, in which 2450 unique patients were seen in hospital regular clinic, 784 patients in dedicated homeless clinic, 688 patients in both hospital regular clinic and dedicated homeless clinic, and 1110 patients with no clinic visits. Twenty-nine percent (230/784) of patients from dedicated homeless clinic utilized the ED, among which 21% (175/844) of their ED visits were considered inappropriate. In contrast, 40% of patients from hospital regular clinic utilized the ED, among which 29% were inappropriate (P < 0.001). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) was 0.61 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.50-0.74, P < 0.001) on dedicated homeless clinic predicting inappropriate ED visits in multivariate logistic regression.
Conclusion: Implementing a dedicated homeless clinic with these features can reduce ED inappropriate utilization among patients experiencing homelessness.

PMID: 33145527 [PubMed]

Perception of Physician Empathy Varies With Educational Level and Gender of Patients Undergoing Low-Yield Computerized Tomographic Imaging.

Tue, 08/25/2020 - 13:09
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Perception of Physician Empathy Varies With Educational Level and Gender of Patients Undergoing Low-Yield Computerized Tomographic Imaging.

J Patient Exp. 2020 Jun;7(3):386-394

Authors: Kline JA, Lin MP, Hall CL, Puskarich MA, Dehon E, Kuehl DR, Wang RC, Hess EP, Runyon MS, Wang H, Courtney DM

Abstract
Objective: Lack of empathic communication between providers and patients may contribute to low value diagnostic testing in emergency care. Accordingly, we measured the perception of physician empathy and trust in patients undergoing low-value computed tomography (CT) in the emergency department (ED).
Methods: Multicenter study of ED patients undergoing CT scanning, acknowledged by ordering physicians as unlikely to show an emergent condition. Near the end of their visit, patients completed the Jefferson Scale of Patient Perception of Physician Empathy (JSPPPE), Trust in Physicians Survey (TIPS), and the Group Based Medical Mistrust Scale (GBMMS). We stratified results by patient demographics including gender, race, and education.
Results: We enrolled 305 participants across 9 sites with diverse geographic, racial, and ethnic representation. The median scores (interquartile ranges) for the JSPPPE, TIPS, and GBMMS for all patients were 29 (24-33.5), 55 (47-62), and 18 (12-29). Compared with white patients, nonwhite patients had similar JSPPPE and TIPS scores but had higher (worse) GBMMS scores. Females had significantly lower JSPPPE and TIPS scores than males, and scores were lower (worse) in females with college degrees. Patients in the lowest tier of educational status had the highest (better) JSPPPE and TIPS scores. Scores were invariant with physician characteristics.
Conclusion: Among patients undergoing low-value CT scanning in the ED, the degree of patient perception of physician empathy and trust varied based on the patients' level of education and gender. Given this variation, an intervention to increase patient perception of physician empathy should contain individualized strategies to address these subgroups, rather than a one-size-fits-all approach.

PMID: 32821799 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Mortality association between obesity and pneumonia using a dual restricted cohort model.

Tue, 07/28/2020 - 04:29
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Mortality association between obesity and pneumonia using a dual restricted cohort model.

Obes Res Clin Pract. 2020 Jul 16;:

Authors: Wang H, Lee CC, Chou EH, Hsu WT, Robinson RD, Su KY, Kirby JJ, Hassani D

Abstract
BACKGROUND: An obesity survival paradox has been reported among obese patients with pneumonia.
AIMS: To determine the impact of obesity on pneumonia outcomes and analyze the correlation between in-hospital all-cause mortality and obesity among patients with pneumonia.
METHODS: The United States Nationwide Readmissions Database (NRD) was retrospectively analyzed for patients with pneumonia from 2013 to 2014. We used a step-wise restricted and propensity score matching cohort model (dual model) to compare mortality rates and other outcomes among pneumonia patients based on BMI. Mortality was calculated by a Cox proportional hazard model, adjusted for potential confounders with propensity score matched analysis.
RESULTS: A total of 70,886,775 patients were registered in NRD during the study period. Of these, 7,786,913 patients (11.0%) were considered obese and 1,652,456 patients (2.3%) were admitted to the hospital with pneumonia. Based on the step-wise restricted cohort model, the hazard ratio comparing the mortality rates among obese pneumonia patients to mortality rates among normal BMI pneumonia patients was 0.75 (95% CI 0.60-0.94). The propensity score matched analysis estimated a hazard rate of 0.84 (95% CI 0.79-0.90) and the hazard ratio estimated from the dual model was 0.82 (95% CI 0.63-1.07).
CONCLUSIONS: With the application of a dual model, there appears to be no significant difference in mortality of obese patients with pneumonia compared to normal BMI patients with pneumonia.

PMID: 32684413 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Two-step predictive model for early detection of emergency department patients with prolonged stay and its management implications.

Sun, 02/23/2020 - 16:10
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Two-step predictive model for early detection of emergency department patients with prolonged stay and its management implications.

Am J Emerg Med. 2020 Jan 30;:

Authors: d'Etienne JP, Zhou Y, Kan C, Shaikh S, Ho AF, Suley E, Blustein EC, Schrader CD, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To develop a novel model for predicting Emergency Department (ED) prolonged length of stay (LOS) patients upon triage completion, and further investigate the benefit of a targeted intervention for patients with prolonged ED LOS.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: A two-step model to predict patients with prolonged ED LOS (>16 h) was constructed. This model was initially used to predict ED resource usage and was subsequently adapted to predict patient ED LOS based on the number of ED resources using binary logistic regressions and was validated internally with accuracy. Finally, a discrete event simulation was used to move patients with predicted prolonged ED LOS directly to a virtual Clinical Decision Unit (CDU). The changes of ED crowding status (Overcrowding, Crowding, and Not-Crowding) and savings of ED bed-hour equivalents were estimated as the measures of the efficacy of this intervention.
RESULTS: We screened a total of 123,975 patient visits with final enrollment of 110,471 patient visits. The overall accuracy of the final model predicting prolonged patient LOS was 67.8%. The C-index of this model ranges from 0.72 to 0.82. By implementing the proposed intervention, the simulation showed a 12% (1044/8760) reduction of ED overcrowded status - an equivalent savings of 129.3 ED bed-hours per day.
CONCLUSIONS: Early prediction of prolonged ED LOS patients and subsequent (simulated) early CDU transfer could lead to more efficiently utilization of ED resources and improved efficacy of ED operations. This study provides evidence to support the implementation of this novel intervention into real healthcare practice.

PMID: 32063427 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Productivity, efficiency, and overall performance comparisons between attendings working solo versus attendings working with residents staffing models in an emergency department: A Large-Scale Retrospective Observational Study.

Sun, 02/09/2020 - 12:56
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Productivity, efficiency, and overall performance comparisons between attendings working solo versus attendings working with residents staffing models in an emergency department: A Large-Scale Retrospective Observational Study.

PLoS One. 2020;15(2):e0228719

Authors: Robinson RD, Dib S, Mclarty D, Shaikh S, Cheeti R, Zhou Y, Ghasemi Y, Rahman M, Schrader CD, Wang H

Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Attending physician productivity and efficiency can be affected when working simultaneously with Residents. To gain a better understanding of this effect, we aim to compare productivity, efficiency, and overall performance differences among Attendings working solo versus working with Residents in an Emergency Department (ED).
METHODS: Data were extracted from the electronic medical records of all patients seen by ED Attendings and/or Residents during the period July 1, 2014 through June 30, 2017. Attending productivity was measured based on the number of new patients enrolled per hour per provider. Attending efficiency was measured based on the provider-to-disposition time (PDT). Attending overall performance was measured by Attending Performance Index (API). Furthermore, Attending productivity, efficiency, and overall performance metrics were compared between Attendings working solo and Attendings working with Residents. The comparisons were analyzed after adjusting for confounders via propensity score matching.
RESULTS: A total of 15 Attendings and 266 Residents managing 111,145 patient encounters over the study period were analyzed. The mean (standard deviation) of Attending productivity and efficiency were 2.9 (1.6) new patients per hour and 2.7 (1.8) hours per patient for Attendings working solo, in comparison to 3.3 (1.9) and 3.0 (2.0) for Attendings working with Residents. When paired with Residents, the API decreased for those Attendings who had a higher API when working solo (average API dropped from 0.21 to 0.19), whereas API increased for those who had a lower API when working solo (average API increased from 0.13 to 0.16).
CONCLUSION: In comparison to the Attending working solo staffing model, increased productivity with decreased efficiency occurred among Attendings when working with Residents. The overall performance of Attendings when working with Residents varied inversely against their performance when working solo.

PMID: 32023302 [PubMed - in process]

Role of ED crowding relative to trauma quality care in a Level 1 Trauma Center.

Sat, 12/21/2019 - 08:22
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Role of ED crowding relative to trauma quality care in a Level 1 Trauma Center.

Am J Emerg Med. 2019 04;37(4):579-584

Authors: Singh N, Robinson RD, Duane TM, Kirby JJ, Lyell C, Buca S, Gandhi R, Mann SM, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Trauma Quality Improvement Program participation among all trauma centers has shown to improve patient outcomes. We aim to identify trauma quality events occurring during the Emergency Department (ED) phase of care.
METHODS: This is a single-center observational study using consecutively registered data in local trauma registry (Jan 1, 2016-Jun 30, 2017). Four ED crowding scores as determined by four different crowding estimation tools were assigned to each enrolled patient upon arrival to the ED. Patient related (age, gender, race, severity of illness, ED disposition), system related (crowding, night shift, ED LOS), and provider related risk factors were analyzed in a multivariate logistic regression model to determine associations relative to ED quality events.
RESULTS: Total 5160 cases were enrolled among which, 605 cases were deemed ED quality improvement (QI) cases and 457 cases were ED provider related. Similar percentages of ED QI cases (10-12%) occurred across the ED crowding status range. No significant difference was appreciated in terms of predictability of ED QI cases relative to different crowding status after adjustment for potential confounders. However, an adjusted odds ratio of 1.64 (95% CI, 1.17-2.30, p < 0.01) regarding ED LOS ≥2 h predictive of ED related quality issues was noted when analyzed using multivariate logistic regression.
CONCLUSION: Provider related issues are a common contributor to undesirable outcomes in trauma care. ED crowding lacks significant association with poor trauma quality care. Prolonged ED LOS (≥2 h) appears to be linked with unfavorable outcomes in ED trauma care.

PMID: 30139579 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Mortality association between obesity and pneumonia using a dual restricted cohort model.

Fri, 10/25/2019 - 19:28
Related Articles

Mortality association between obesity and pneumonia using a dual restricted cohort model.

Obes Res Clin Pract. 2019 Oct 18;:

Authors: Wang H, Lee CC, Chou EH, Hsu WT, Robinson RD, Su KY, Kirby JJ, Hassani D

Abstract
BACKGROUND: An obesity survival paradox has been reported among obese patients with pneumonia.
AIMS: To determine the impact of obesity on pneumonia outcomes and analyze the correlation between in-hospital all-cause mortality and obesity among patients with pneumonia.
METHODS: The United States Nationwide Readmissions Database (NRD) was retrospectively analyzed for patients with pneumonia from 2013 to 2014. We used a step-wise restricted and propensity score matching cohort model (dual model) to compare mortality rates and other outcomes among pneumonia patients based on BMI. Mortality was calculated by a Cox proportional hazard model, adjusted for potential confounders with propensity score matched analysis.
RESULTS: A total of 70,886,775 patients were registered in NRD during the study period. Of these, 7,786,913 patients (11.0%) were considered obese and 1,652,456 patients (2.3%) were admitted to the hospital with pneumonia. Based on the step-wise restricted cohort model, the hazard ratio comparing the mortality rates among obese pneumonia patients to mortality rates among normal BMI pneumonia patients was 0.75 (95% CI 0.60-0.94). The propensity score matched analysis estimated a hazard rate of 0.84 (95% CI 0.79-0.90) and the hazard ratio estimated from the dual model was 0.82 (95% CI 0.63-1.07).
CONCLUSIONS: With the application of a dual model, there appears to be no significant difference in mortality of obese patients with pneumonia compared to normal BMI patients with pneumonia.

PMID: 31635969 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Emergency Medicine Resident Efficiency and Emergency Department Crowding.

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 04:01
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Emergency Medicine Resident Efficiency and Emergency Department Crowding.

AEM Educ Train. 2019 Jul;3(3):209-217

Authors: Kirby R, Robinson RD, Dib S, Mclarty D, Shaikh S, Cheeti R, Ho AF, Schrader CD, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
Objectives: Provider efficiency has been reported in the literature but there is a lack of efficiency analysis among emergency medicine (EM) residents. We aim to compare efficiency of EM residents of different training levels and determine if EM resident efficiency is affected by emergency department (ED) crowding.
Methods: We conducted a single-center retrospective observation study from July 1, 2014, to June 30, 2017. The number of new patients per resident per hour and provider-to-disposition (PTD) time of each patient were used as resident efficiency markers. A crowding score was assigned to each patient upon the patient's arrival to the ED. We compared efficiency among EM residents of different training levels under different ED crowding statuses. Dynamic efficiency changes were compared monthly through the entire academic year (July to next June).
Results: The study enrolled a total of 150,920 patients. A mean of 1.9 patients/hour was seen by PGY-1 EM residents in comparison to 2.6 patients/hour by PGY-2 and -3 EM residents. Median PTD was 2.8 hours in PGY-1 EM residents versus 2.6 hours in PGY-2 and -3 EM residents. There were no significant differences in acuity across all patients seen by EM residents. When crowded conditions existed, residency efficiency increased, but such changes were minimized when the ED became overcrowded. A linear increase of resident efficiency was observed only in PGY-1 EM residents throughout the entire academic year.
Conclusion: Resident efficiency improved significantly only during their first year of EM training. This efficiency can be affected by ED crowding.

PMID: 31360813 [PubMed]

Common step-wise interventions improved primary care clinic visits and reduced emergency department discharge failures: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

Fri, 07/12/2019 - 00:24
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Common step-wise interventions improved primary care clinic visits and reduced emergency department discharge failures: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

BMC Health Serv Res. 2019 Jul 04;19(1):451

Authors: Schrader CD, Robinson RD, Blair S, Shaikh S, Ho AF, D'Etienne JP, Kirby JJ, Cheeti R, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
BACKGROUND: It is critical to understand whether providing health insurance coverage, assigning a dedicated Primary Care Physician (PCP), and arranging timely post-Emergency Department (ED) clinic follow-up can improve compliance with clinic visits and reduce ED discharge failures. We aim to determine the benefits of providing these common step-wise interventions and further investigate the necessity of urgent PCP referrals on behalf of ED discharged patients.
METHODS: This is a single-center retrospective observational study. All patients discharged from the ED over the period Jan 1, 2015 through Dec 31, 2017 were included in the study population. Step-wise interventions included providing charity health insurance, assigning a dedicated PCP, and providing ED follow-up clinics. PCP clinic compliance and ED discharge failures were measured and compared among groups receiving different interventions.
RESULT: A total of 227,627 patients were included. Fifty-eight percent of patients receiving charity insurance had PCP visits in comparison to 23% of patients without charity insurance (p < 0.001). Seventy-seven percent of patients with charity insurance and PCP assignments completed post-ED discharge PCP visits in comparison to only 4.5% of those with neither charity insurance nor PCP assignments (p < 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS: Step-wise interventions increased patient clinic follow-up compliance while simultaneously reducing ED discharge failures. Such interventions might benefit communities with similar patient populations.

PMID: 31272442 [PubMed - in process]

Identifying diverse concepts of discharge failure patients at emergency department in the USA: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

Thu, 07/04/2019 - 21:46
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Identifying diverse concepts of discharge failure patients at emergency department in the USA: a large-scale retrospective observational study.

BMJ Open. 2019 Jun 27;9(6):e028051

Authors: Schrader CD, Robinson RD, Blair S, Shaikh S, d'Etienne JP, Kirby JJ, Cheeti R, Zenarosa NR, Wang H

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Identifying patients who are at high risk for discharge failure allows for implementation of interventions to improve their care. However, discharge failure is currently defined in literature with great variability, making targeted interventions more difficult. We aim to derive a screening tool based on the existing diverse discharge failure models.
DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: This is a single-centre retrospective cohort study in the USA. Data from all patients discharged from the emergency department were collected from 1 January 2015 through 31 December 2017 and followed up within 30 days.
METHODS: Scoring systems were derived using modified Framingham methods. Sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operational characteristic (AUC) were calculated and compared using both the broad and restricted discharge failure models.
RESULTS: A total of 227 627 patients were included. The Screening for Healthcare fOllow-Up Tool (SHOUT) scoring system was derived based on the broad and restricted discharge failure models and applied back to the entire study cohort. A sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 71% were found in SHOUT scores to identify patients with broad discharge failure with AUC of 0.83 (95% CI 0.83 to 0.84). When applied to a 3-day restricted discharge failure model, a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 60% were found to identify patients with AUC of 0.79 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.80).
CONCLUSION: The SHOUT scoring system was derived and used to screen and identify patients that would ultimately become discharge failures, especially when using broad definitions of discharge failure. The SHOUT tool was internally validated and can be used to identify patients across a wide spectrum of discharge failure definitions.

PMID: 31248927 [PubMed - in process]

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