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Pelvic Binder Utlization in Combat Casualties: Does It Matter?

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Pelvic Binder Utlization in Combat Casualties: Does It Matter?

Am Surg. 2020 Jul 28;:3134820939928

Authors: Parker WJ, Despain RW, Delgado A, Rodriguez CJ, Baird D, Elster EA, Bradley MJ

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utilization of pelvic binders, the proper placement of binders, and to determine any differences in blood product transfusions between combat casualties with and without a pelvic binder identified on initial imaging immediately after the injury.
METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of all combat-injured patients who arrived at our military treatment hospital between 2010 and 2012 with a documented pelvic fracture. Initial imaging (X-ray or computed tomography) immediately after injury were evaluated by 2 independent radiologists. Young-Burgess (YB) classification, pelvic diastasis, correct binder placement over the greater trochanters, and the presence of a pelvic external fixator (ex-fix) was recorded. Injury severity score (ISS), whole blood, and blood component therapy administered within the first 24-hours after injury were compared between casualties with and without a pelvic binder.
RESULTS: 39 casualties had overseas imaging to confirm and radiographically classify a YB pelvic ring injury. The most common fracture patterns were anteroposterior (53%) and lateral compression (28%). 49% (19/39) did not have a binder or ex-fix identified on initial imaging or in any documentation after injury. Ten patients had a binder, with 30% positioned incorrectly over the iliac crest. ISS (34 ± 1.6) was not statistically different between the binder and the no-binder group. Pubic symphysis diastasis was significantly lower in the binder group (1.4 ± 0.2 vs 3.7 ± 0.5, P < .001). There was a trend toward decreased 24-hour total blood products between the binder and no-binder groups (75 ± 11 vs 82 ± 13, P = .67). This was due to less cryoprecipitate in the binder group (6 ± 2 vs 19 ± 5, P = .01).
CONCLUSIONS: Pelvic binder placement in combat trauma may be inconsistent and an important area for continued training. While 24-hour total transfusions do not appear to be different, no-binder patients received significantly more cryoprecipitate.

PMID: 32720511 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Do We Need a Modified HEART Score to Risk Stratify Chest Pain Patients in the Emergency Department?

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Do We Need a Modified HEART Score to Risk Stratify Chest Pain Patients in the Emergency Department?

Am J Cardiol. 2020 Jun 29;:

Authors: Schrader CD, Meyering S, Wang H

PMID: 32718556 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Mortality association between obesity and pneumonia using a dual restricted cohort model.

Richard Robinson, MD - Tue, 07/28/2020 - 04:29
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Mortality association between obesity and pneumonia using a dual restricted cohort model.

Obes Res Clin Pract. 2020 Jul 16;:

Authors: Wang H, Lee CC, Chou EH, Hsu WT, Robinson RD, Su KY, Kirby JJ, Hassani D

Abstract
BACKGROUND: An obesity survival paradox has been reported among obese patients with pneumonia.
AIMS: To determine the impact of obesity on pneumonia outcomes and analyze the correlation between in-hospital all-cause mortality and obesity among patients with pneumonia.
METHODS: The United States Nationwide Readmissions Database (NRD) was retrospectively analyzed for patients with pneumonia from 2013 to 2014. We used a step-wise restricted and propensity score matching cohort model (dual model) to compare mortality rates and other outcomes among pneumonia patients based on BMI. Mortality was calculated by a Cox proportional hazard model, adjusted for potential confounders with propensity score matched analysis.
RESULTS: A total of 70,886,775 patients were registered in NRD during the study period. Of these, 7,786,913 patients (11.0%) were considered obese and 1,652,456 patients (2.3%) were admitted to the hospital with pneumonia. Based on the step-wise restricted cohort model, the hazard ratio comparing the mortality rates among obese pneumonia patients to mortality rates among normal BMI pneumonia patients was 0.75 (95% CI 0.60-0.94). The propensity score matched analysis estimated a hazard rate of 0.84 (95% CI 0.79-0.90) and the hazard ratio estimated from the dual model was 0.82 (95% CI 0.63-1.07).
CONCLUSIONS: With the application of a dual model, there appears to be no significant difference in mortality of obese patients with pneumonia compared to normal BMI patients with pneumonia.

PMID: 32684413 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Mortality association between obesity and pneumonia using a dual restricted cohort model.

Hao Wang, MD - Tue, 07/28/2020 - 04:29
Related Articles

Mortality association between obesity and pneumonia using a dual restricted cohort model.

Obes Res Clin Pract. 2020 Jul 16;:

Authors: Wang H, Lee CC, Chou EH, Hsu WT, Robinson RD, Su KY, Kirby JJ, Hassani D

Abstract
BACKGROUND: An obesity survival paradox has been reported among obese patients with pneumonia.
AIMS: To determine the impact of obesity on pneumonia outcomes and analyze the correlation between in-hospital all-cause mortality and obesity among patients with pneumonia.
METHODS: The United States Nationwide Readmissions Database (NRD) was retrospectively analyzed for patients with pneumonia from 2013 to 2014. We used a step-wise restricted and propensity score matching cohort model (dual model) to compare mortality rates and other outcomes among pneumonia patients based on BMI. Mortality was calculated by a Cox proportional hazard model, adjusted for potential confounders with propensity score matched analysis.
RESULTS: A total of 70,886,775 patients were registered in NRD during the study period. Of these, 7,786,913 patients (11.0%) were considered obese and 1,652,456 patients (2.3%) were admitted to the hospital with pneumonia. Based on the step-wise restricted cohort model, the hazard ratio comparing the mortality rates among obese pneumonia patients to mortality rates among normal BMI pneumonia patients was 0.75 (95% CI 0.60-0.94). The propensity score matched analysis estimated a hazard rate of 0.84 (95% CI 0.79-0.90) and the hazard ratio estimated from the dual model was 0.82 (95% CI 0.63-1.07).
CONCLUSIONS: With the application of a dual model, there appears to be no significant difference in mortality of obese patients with pneumonia compared to normal BMI patients with pneumonia.

PMID: 32684413 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Mortality association between obesity and pneumonia using a dual restricted cohort model.

Dahlia Hassani, MD - Tue, 07/28/2020 - 04:29
Related Articles

Mortality association between obesity and pneumonia using a dual restricted cohort model.

Obes Res Clin Pract. 2020 Jul 16;:

Authors: Wang H, Lee CC, Chou EH, Hsu WT, Robinson RD, Su KY, Kirby JJ, Hassani D

Abstract
BACKGROUND: An obesity survival paradox has been reported among obese patients with pneumonia.
AIMS: To determine the impact of obesity on pneumonia outcomes and analyze the correlation between in-hospital all-cause mortality and obesity among patients with pneumonia.
METHODS: The United States Nationwide Readmissions Database (NRD) was retrospectively analyzed for patients with pneumonia from 2013 to 2014. We used a step-wise restricted and propensity score matching cohort model (dual model) to compare mortality rates and other outcomes among pneumonia patients based on BMI. Mortality was calculated by a Cox proportional hazard model, adjusted for potential confounders with propensity score matched analysis.
RESULTS: A total of 70,886,775 patients were registered in NRD during the study period. Of these, 7,786,913 patients (11.0%) were considered obese and 1,652,456 patients (2.3%) were admitted to the hospital with pneumonia. Based on the step-wise restricted cohort model, the hazard ratio comparing the mortality rates among obese pneumonia patients to mortality rates among normal BMI pneumonia patients was 0.75 (95% CI 0.60-0.94). The propensity score matched analysis estimated a hazard rate of 0.84 (95% CI 0.79-0.90) and the hazard ratio estimated from the dual model was 0.82 (95% CI 0.63-1.07).
CONCLUSIONS: With the application of a dual model, there appears to be no significant difference in mortality of obese patients with pneumonia compared to normal BMI patients with pneumonia.

PMID: 32684413 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Mortality association between obesity and pneumonia using a dual restricted cohort model.

Related Articles

Mortality association between obesity and pneumonia using a dual restricted cohort model.

Obes Res Clin Pract. 2020 Jul 16;:

Authors: Wang H, Lee CC, Chou EH, Hsu WT, Robinson RD, Su KY, Kirby JJ, Hassani D

Abstract
BACKGROUND: An obesity survival paradox has been reported among obese patients with pneumonia.
AIMS: To determine the impact of obesity on pneumonia outcomes and analyze the correlation between in-hospital all-cause mortality and obesity among patients with pneumonia.
METHODS: The United States Nationwide Readmissions Database (NRD) was retrospectively analyzed for patients with pneumonia from 2013 to 2014. We used a step-wise restricted and propensity score matching cohort model (dual model) to compare mortality rates and other outcomes among pneumonia patients based on BMI. Mortality was calculated by a Cox proportional hazard model, adjusted for potential confounders with propensity score matched analysis.
RESULTS: A total of 70,886,775 patients were registered in NRD during the study period. Of these, 7,786,913 patients (11.0%) were considered obese and 1,652,456 patients (2.3%) were admitted to the hospital with pneumonia. Based on the step-wise restricted cohort model, the hazard ratio comparing the mortality rates among obese pneumonia patients to mortality rates among normal BMI pneumonia patients was 0.75 (95% CI 0.60-0.94). The propensity score matched analysis estimated a hazard rate of 0.84 (95% CI 0.79-0.90) and the hazard ratio estimated from the dual model was 0.82 (95% CI 0.63-1.07).
CONCLUSIONS: With the application of a dual model, there appears to be no significant difference in mortality of obese patients with pneumonia compared to normal BMI patients with pneumonia.

PMID: 32684413 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Substernal goiter excision in a Jehovah's Witness.

Roderick Y. Kim DDS, MD - Tue, 07/21/2020 - 03:23
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Substernal goiter excision in a Jehovah's Witness.

Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent). 2020 Jul;33(3):462-464

Authors: Kholaki O, Wentland TR, Kim RY

Abstract
Jehovah's Witnesses present a unique challenge in oral and head and neck surgery. We report a case of a substernal goiter excised on a Jehovah's Witness without the use of blood transfusion, in accordance with the patient's beliefs. Additionally, we review the literature on the care of this patient population, focusing on preoperative optimization, perioperative management, and postoperative care.

PMID: 32675989 [PubMed]

Substernal goiter excision in a Jehovah's Witness.

Related Articles

Substernal goiter excision in a Jehovah's Witness.

Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent). 2020 Jul;33(3):462-464

Authors: Kholaki O, Wentland TR, Kim RY

Abstract
Jehovah's Witnesses present a unique challenge in oral and head and neck surgery. We report a case of a substernal goiter excised on a Jehovah's Witness without the use of blood transfusion, in accordance with the patient's beliefs. Additionally, we review the literature on the care of this patient population, focusing on preoperative optimization, perioperative management, and postoperative care.

PMID: 32675989 [PubMed]

Combat trauma-related invasive fungal wound infections.

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Combat trauma-related invasive fungal wound infections.

Curr Fungal Infect Rep. 2020 Jun;14(2):186-196

Authors: Tribble DR, Ganesan A, Rodriguez CJ

Abstract
Purpose of review: This review highlights research from the past five years on combat trauma-related invasive fungal wound infections (IFIs) with a focus on risk stratification to aid patient management, microbiology, and diagnostics.
Recent Findings: A revised classification scheme stratifies wounds into three risk groups: IFI, High Suspicion of IFI, and Low Suspicion of IFI. This stratification is based on persistence of wound necrosis and laboratory fungal evidence, presence of signs/symptoms of deep soft-tissue infections, and the need for antifungals. Use of this classification could allow for prioritization of antifungal therapy. Further, IFIs delay wound healing, particularly when caused by fungi of the order Mucorales. Lastly, molecular sequencing offers promising and complimentary results to the gold standard histopathology.
Summary: Optimal management of combat-related IFIs depends on early tissue-based diagnosis with aggressive surgical debridement and concomitant dual antifungal therapy. Further research on clinical decision support tools and rapid diagnostics are needed.

PMID: 32665807 [PubMed]

Orthopaedic Trauma-Induced Pyoderma Gangrenosum: A Case Report.

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Orthopaedic Trauma-Induced Pyoderma Gangrenosum: A Case Report.

JBJS Case Connect. 2020 Apr-Jun;10(2):e0562

Authors: Hoelscher S, Hunter A, Barcak E, Wheeler M, Mapula S

Abstract
CASE: We present a case of a 60-year-old polytraumatized man who developed postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) after his initial stabilization procedures, mimicking a postoperative infection. This caused a delay in diagnosis, leading to progression of his wounds and a delay in initiation of the appropriate treatment. Once his PG was appropriately treated, his clinical status and wounds improved. He underwent successful wound coverage by plastic surgery and has been recovering from his injuries.
CONCLUSION: Prompt identification and initiation of treatment for postoperative PG is critical to avoid exacerbation of wounds and subsequent morbidity to the patient.

PMID: 32649133 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Improving quality in a complex primary care system-An example of refugee care and literature review.

Richard Young, MD - Tue, 07/07/2020 - 00:18
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Improving quality in a complex primary care system-An example of refugee care and literature review.

J Eval Clin Pract. 2020 Jun 29;:e13430

Authors: Young RA, Nelson MJ, Castellon RE, Martin CM

Abstract
RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Applying traditional industrial quality improvement (QI) methodologies to primary care is often inappropriate because primary care and its relationship to the healthcare macrosystem has many features of a complex adaptive system (CAS) that is particularly responsive to bottom-up rather than top-down management approaches. We report on a demonstration case study of improvements made in the Family Health Center (FHC) of the JPS Health Network in a refugee patient population that illustrate features of QI in a CAS framework as opposed to a traditional QI approach.
METHODS: We report on changes in health system utilization by new refugee patients of the FHC from 2016 to 2017. We review the literature and summarize relevant theoretical understandings of quality management in complex adaptive systems as it applies to this case example.
RESULTS: Applying CAS principles in the FHC, utilization of the Emergency Department and Urgent Care Center by newly arrived refugee patients before their first clinic visit was reduced by more than half (total visits decreased from 31%-14% of the refugee patients). Our review of the literature demonstrates that traditional algorithmic top-down QI processes are most often unsuccessful in improving even a few single-disease metrics, and increases clinician burnout and penalizes clinicians who care for vulnerable patients. Improvement in a CAS occurs when front-line clinicians identify care gaps and are given the flexibility to learn and self-organize to enable new care processes to emerge, which are created from bottom-up leadership that utilize existing interdependencies and interact with the top levels of the organization through intelligent top-down causation. We give examples of early adapters who are better applying the principles of CAS change to their QI efforts.
CONCLUSIONS: Meaningful improvement in primary care is more likely achieved when the impetus to implement change shifts from top-down to bottom-up.

PMID: 32596835 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Improving quality in a complex primary care system-An example of refugee care and literature review.

Related Articles

Improving quality in a complex primary care system-An example of refugee care and literature review.

J Eval Clin Pract. 2020 Jun 29;:e13430

Authors: Young RA, Nelson MJ, Castellon RE, Martin CM

Abstract
RATIONALE, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: Applying traditional industrial quality improvement (QI) methodologies to primary care is often inappropriate because primary care and its relationship to the healthcare macrosystem has many features of a complex adaptive system (CAS) that is particularly responsive to bottom-up rather than top-down management approaches. We report on a demonstration case study of improvements made in the Family Health Center (FHC) of the JPS Health Network in a refugee patient population that illustrate features of QI in a CAS framework as opposed to a traditional QI approach.
METHODS: We report on changes in health system utilization by new refugee patients of the FHC from 2016 to 2017. We review the literature and summarize relevant theoretical understandings of quality management in complex adaptive systems as it applies to this case example.
RESULTS: Applying CAS principles in the FHC, utilization of the Emergency Department and Urgent Care Center by newly arrived refugee patients before their first clinic visit was reduced by more than half (total visits decreased from 31%-14% of the refugee patients). Our review of the literature demonstrates that traditional algorithmic top-down QI processes are most often unsuccessful in improving even a few single-disease metrics, and increases clinician burnout and penalizes clinicians who care for vulnerable patients. Improvement in a CAS occurs when front-line clinicians identify care gaps and are given the flexibility to learn and self-organize to enable new care processes to emerge, which are created from bottom-up leadership that utilize existing interdependencies and interact with the top levels of the organization through intelligent top-down causation. We give examples of early adapters who are better applying the principles of CAS change to their QI efforts.
CONCLUSIONS: Meaningful improvement in primary care is more likely achieved when the impetus to implement change shifts from top-down to bottom-up.

PMID: 32596835 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Increased Presence of Perineural Invasion in the Tongue and Floor of the Mouth: Could It Represent a More Aggressive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma, or Do Larger Aggressive Tumors Cause Perineural Invasion?

Roderick Y. Kim DDS, MD - Mon, 06/29/2020 - 23:08
Related Articles

Increased Presence of Perineural Invasion in the Tongue and Floor of the Mouth: Could It Represent a More Aggressive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma, or Do Larger Aggressive Tumors Cause Perineural Invasion?

J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2019 Apr;77(4):852-858

Authors: Kim RY, Helman JI, Braun TM, Ward BB

Abstract
PURPOSE: Despite data showing worse outcomes and aggressive disease behavior, perineural invasion (PNI) has not been well characterized in terms of tumor location, histopathologic features, or cervical lymph node status. The specific aims of this study were to measure correlations between PNI, tumor location, and other known histopathologic characteristics used to define aggressive disease.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity who underwent neck dissection. We excluded patients whose neck was previously treated with surgery or radiation therapy. Demographic and histopathologic variables of interest were obtained from patient charts. The primary outcome of interest was PNI, and the predictors of interest included tumor location, histopathologic tumor characteristics, and cervical lymph node status. For continuous variables, mean differences were compared by t tests. For categorical variables, the differences in the distribution of the proportions were analyzed with the χ2 test. All variables were entered simultaneously into a multivariate logistic regression model to control for possible confounding. Statistical significance for the study was set at P < .05.
RESULTS: Three hundred sixty-eight patients met the study criteria. PNI showed statistically significant correlations with lymph node status, tumor depth, and specific primary tumor location. PNI was more likely to be seen in tumors located in the tongue or floor of the mouth. Tumors with PNI had a deeper depth of invasion: 15.9 ± 10.9 mm versus 10.2 ± 10.0 mm (P < .001). PNI tumors had a higher mean total number of positive nodes: 2.85 ± 5.23 versus 0.83 ± 1.80 (P < .001).
CONCLUSIONS: PNI is statistically correlated with tongue and floor-of-the-mouth subsites within the oral cavity, as well as larger tumors, deeper tumors, and disease that has progressed to the lymph nodes. Whether this correlation represents causation in either direction remains unknown.

PMID: 30142323 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Increased Presence of Perineural Invasion in the Tongue and Floor of the Mouth: Could It Represent a More Aggressive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma, or Do Larger Aggressive Tumors Cause Perineural Invasion?

Related Articles

Increased Presence of Perineural Invasion in the Tongue and Floor of the Mouth: Could It Represent a More Aggressive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma, or Do Larger Aggressive Tumors Cause Perineural Invasion?

J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2019 Apr;77(4):852-858

Authors: Kim RY, Helman JI, Braun TM, Ward BB

Abstract
PURPOSE: Despite data showing worse outcomes and aggressive disease behavior, perineural invasion (PNI) has not been well characterized in terms of tumor location, histopathologic features, or cervical lymph node status. The specific aims of this study were to measure correlations between PNI, tumor location, and other known histopathologic characteristics used to define aggressive disease.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity who underwent neck dissection. We excluded patients whose neck was previously treated with surgery or radiation therapy. Demographic and histopathologic variables of interest were obtained from patient charts. The primary outcome of interest was PNI, and the predictors of interest included tumor location, histopathologic tumor characteristics, and cervical lymph node status. For continuous variables, mean differences were compared by t tests. For categorical variables, the differences in the distribution of the proportions were analyzed with the χ2 test. All variables were entered simultaneously into a multivariate logistic regression model to control for possible confounding. Statistical significance for the study was set at P < .05.
RESULTS: Three hundred sixty-eight patients met the study criteria. PNI showed statistically significant correlations with lymph node status, tumor depth, and specific primary tumor location. PNI was more likely to be seen in tumors located in the tongue or floor of the mouth. Tumors with PNI had a deeper depth of invasion: 15.9 ± 10.9 mm versus 10.2 ± 10.0 mm (P < .001). PNI tumors had a higher mean total number of positive nodes: 2.85 ± 5.23 versus 0.83 ± 1.80 (P < .001).
CONCLUSIONS: PNI is statistically correlated with tongue and floor-of-the-mouth subsites within the oral cavity, as well as larger tumors, deeper tumors, and disease that has progressed to the lymph nodes. Whether this correlation represents causation in either direction remains unknown.

PMID: 30142323 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

The effect of insurance status on overall survival among children and adolescents with cancer.

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The effect of insurance status on overall survival among children and adolescents with cancer.

Int J Epidemiol. 2020 Jun 23;:

Authors: Wang X, Ojha RP, Partap S, Johnson KJ

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Differences in access, delivery and utilisation of health care may impact childhood and adolescent cancer survival. We evaluated whether insurance coverage impacts survival among US children and adolescents with cancer diagnoses, overall and by age group, and explored potential mechanisms.
METHODS: Data from 58 421 children (aged ≤14 years) and adolescents (15-19 years), diagnosed with cancer from 2004 to 2010, were obtained from the National Cancer Database. We examined associations between insurance status at initial diagnosis or treatment and diagnosis stage; any treatment received; and mortality using logistic regression, Cox proportional hazards (PH) regression, restricted mean survival time (RMST) and mediation analyses.
RESULTS: Relative to privately insured individuals, the hazard of death (all-cause) was increased and survival months were decreased in those with Medicaid [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22 to 1.33; and -1.73 months, 95% CI: -2.07 to -1.38] and no insurance (HR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.20 to 1.46; and -2.13 months, 95% CI: -2.91 to -1.34). The HR for Medicaid vs. private insurance was larger (pinteraction <0.001) in adolescents (HR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.41 to 1.64) than children (HR = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.10 to 1.23). Despite statistical evidence violation of the PH assumption, RMST results supported all interpretations. Earlier diagnosis for staged cancers in the Medicaid and uninsured populations accounted for an estimated 13% and 19% of the survival deficit, respectively, vs. the privately insured population. Any treatment received did not account for insurance-associated survival differences in children and adolescents with cancer.
CONCLUSIONS: Children and adolescents without private insurance had a higher risk of death and shorter survival within 5 years following cancer diagnosis. Additional research is needed to understand underlying mechanisms.

PMID: 32572489 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Erectile dysfunction: How to help patients and partners.

Katherine Buck, PhD - Mon, 06/22/2020 - 20:27
Related Articles

Erectile dysfunction: How to help patients and partners.

J Fam Pract. 2020 Jun;69(5):251-254

Authors: Buck K, Stratton J, Hodgson J

Abstract
This guide and helpful list of key questions can provide a therapeutic framework for addressing the relationship side of ED.

PMID: 32555756 [PubMed - in process]

Erectile dysfunction: How to help patients and partners.

Related Articles

Erectile dysfunction: How to help patients and partners.

J Fam Pract. 2020 Jun;69(5):251-254

Authors: Buck K, Stratton J, Hodgson J

Abstract
This guide and helpful list of key questions can provide a therapeutic framework for addressing the relationship side of ED.

PMID: 32555756 [PubMed - in process]

Associations of thoracic cage size and configuration with outcomes of adult in-hospital cardiac arrest: A retrospective cohort study.

Related Articles

Associations of thoracic cage size and configuration with outcomes of adult in-hospital cardiac arrest: A retrospective cohort study.

J Formos Med Assoc. 2020 Jun 11;:

Authors: Pei-Chuan Huang E, Fu CM, Chang WT, Huang CH, Tsai MS, Chou E, Wolfshohl J, Wang CH, Wu YW, Chen WJ

Abstract
BACKGROUND: To analyse the association of thoracic cage size and configuration with outcomes following in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA).
METHODS: A single-centred retrospective study was conducted. Adult patients experiencing IHCA during 2006-2015 were screened. By analysing computed tomography images, we measured thoracic anterior-posterior and transverse diameters, circumference, and both anterior and posterior subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) depths at the level of the internipple line (INL). We also recorded the anatomical structure located immediately posterior to the sternum at the INL.
RESULTS: A total of 649 patients were included. The median thoracic circumference was 88.6 cm. The median anterior and posterior thoracic SAT depths were 0.9 and 1.5 cm, respectively. The ascending aorta was found to be the most common retrosternal structure (57.6%) at the INL. Multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated that anterior thoracic SAT depth of 0.8-1.6 cm (odds ratio [OR]: 2.98, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.40-6.35; p-value = 0.005) and thoracic circumference of 83.9-95.0 cm (OR: 2.48, 95% CI: 1.16-5.29; p-value = 0.02) were positively associated with a favourable neurological outcome while left ventricular outflow track or aortic root beneath sternum at the level of INL was inversely associated with a favourable neurological outcome (OR: 0.37, 95% CI: 0.15-0.91; p-value = 0.03).
CONCLUSION: Thoracic circumference and anatomic configuration might be associated with IHCA outcomes. This proof-of-concept study suggested that a one-size-fits-all resuscitation technique might not be suitable. Further investigation is needed to investigate the method of providing personalized resuscitation tailored to patient needs.

PMID: 32536380 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Diversity and Inclusion: The Foundation for All Milestones.

Related Articles

Diversity and Inclusion: The Foundation for All Milestones.

Fam Med. 2020 Jun;52(6):459-460

Authors: Elliott TC, Ko S

PMID: 32520384 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Validation of the Ask Suicide-Screening Questions for Adult Medical Inpatients: A Brief Tool for All Ages.

Cynthia Claassen, PhD - Mon, 06/08/2020 - 16:43
Related Articles

Validation of the Ask Suicide-Screening Questions for Adult Medical Inpatients: A Brief Tool for All Ages.

Psychosomatics. 2020 Apr 28;:

Authors: Horowitz LM, Snyder DJ, Boudreaux ED, He JP, Harrington CJ, Cai J, Claassen CA, Salhany JE, Dao T, Chaves JF, Jobes DA, Merikangas KR, Bridge JA, Pao M

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few brief suicide risk screening instruments are validated for use in both adult and pediatric medical populations. Using the pediatric Ask Suicide-Screening Questions (ASQ) development study as a model, this study aimed to determine whether the ASQ is a valid suicide risk-screening instrument for use among adults medical patients, as well as to evaluate a set of other potential screening questions for use in adults.
METHODS: Adult patients hospitalized on inpatient medical/surgical units from 4 hospitals were recruited to participate in a cross-sectional instrument-validation study. The 4-item ASQ and other candidate items were compared against the 25-item, previously validated Adult Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire as the criterion standard.
RESULTS: A total of 727 adult medical inpatients completed the screening process. Compared with the Adult Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire, the ASQ performed best among the full set of candidate items, demonstrating strong psychometric properties, with a sensitivity of 100% (95% confidence interval = 90%-100%), a specificity of 89% (95% confidence interval = 86%-91%), and a negative predictive value of 100% (95% confidence interval = 99%-100%). A total of 4.8% (35/727) of the participants screened positive for suicide risk based on the standard criterion Adult Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire.
CONCLUSIONS: The ASQ is a valid and brief suicide risk-screening tool for use among adults. Screening medical/surgical inpatients for suicide risk can be performed effectively for both adult and pediatric patients using this brief, primary screener.

PMID: 32487323 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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